Prepare 2015 – $20 and 15 Minutes – April Goal

Spring has brought with it new energy and a beautiful new beginning. We have some challenging times ahead of us, but there is great reason to celebrate and look forward to a bright future. Producing your own food provides food security in times of economic challenges and increases overall health.

Last month’s goal included planting bare root fruit and nut trees, berry bushes, and vines that will help provide vital nutrients for your family everyday.  They beautify your landscape and provide food security for challenging times. This gorgeous display of pink blossoms is from a 4 year old hardy almond tree in my yard. It’s not too late to plant some fruit or nut trees this spring!

Spring almond blossoms 2 2015 Copyright Your Family Ark LLC

Your challenge this month is to spend $20 on seeds and to spend 15 minutes planning your new garden. Just think of the delicious bounty you could be harvesting in just a few short months if invest some time and energy now.

It’s that simple. $20 and a little bit of smart planning and you are on your way. You may just find the time you spend in your vegetable patch to be quite therapeutic and rewarding. Don’t let this opportunity pass you by. You can do this!

You can get some great ideas for producing massive amounts of vegetables from a small 1/10th acre home in California at Urban Homestead. Explore a wide variety of methods from Marjory Wildcraft at Grow Your Own Groceries. You can learn how to create a self-sustaining food forest from Geoff Lawton’s free videos.

Kylene's Kitchen Garden - Copyright Your Family Ark LLC

Check out gardening books at your local library or purchase a few good reference books for your home library. These are a few that might interest you.

All New Square Foot Gardening, Second Edition: The Revolutionary Way to Grow More In Less Space. This book is a classic with great ideas to grow in small spaces.

Gaia’s Garden: A Guide to Home-Scale Permaculture, 2nd Edition. This is one of my personal favorites. The author teaches permaculture principles that result in a self-sustaining food forest.

The Forgotten Skills of Self-Sufficiency Used by the Mormon Pioneers. Caleb Warnock takes a look at the techniques used by the early pioneers.

The Backyard Homestead: Produce all the food you need on just a quarter acre!. It is possible to grow a serious amount of food in your own backyard with a little knowledge and planning.

The Edible Balcony: Growing Fresh Produce in Small Spaces. You are not off the hook if you live in an apartment without much space. It is possible to use that little bit of space and produce fresh food.

Vertical Vegetables & Fruit: Creative Gardening Techniques for Growing Up in Small Spaces. Take advantage of unused vertical space to grow more produce in a small area.

Vertical Gardening: Grow Up, Not Out, for More Vegetables and Flowers in Much Less Space. Another resource for vertical gardening.

Boys gardening - Copyright Your Family Ark LLC

Where do you get good quality seeds? I prefer non-GMO, heirloom seeds. I have a few favorite suppliers. I usually purchase the more popular seeds in the fall when retailers are clearing them out. However, there are always new exciting varieties that I want to try which are usually only available through online seed companies. These are few that I like. Request a free catalog to help you with your planning.

Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds

Johnny’s Selected Seeds

Seed Savers

Peaceful Valley

Mountain Valley Seed Company

Amazon carries a variety of seeds

There are hundreds of different methods to grow your own food. You chose whichever method works best for your personal circumstances. Grow the foods that you like. If you hate tomatoes, do not feel obligated to grow them! Although home grown tomatoes taste very different from the ones at the local grocery store. Experiment with new vegetables and new varieties. It really can be a great experience.

Your April 2015 goal is to spend $20 on seeds and at least 15 minutes planning your garden. Remember that growing your own produce will result in greater food security along with increased mental and physical health. Get to work!