Category «Cooking without Power»

Ideas for cooking when the power goes out.

Retained Heat Cooking: The Secret to Stretching Your Fuel Supplies

The power is out and you have no idea how long until it will be restored. How will you cook your food in an emergency with limited fuel? Retained heat cooking can help you stretch your stored fuels to outlast the crisis. All cooking methods have one thing in common: fuel is required. If you …

Emergency Cooking: 12 Family Favorites

A wildfire is blazing just over the mountain from us and many citizens are under evacuation and pre-evacuation orders. A disaster threatening just around the corner motivated me to check our emergency preparations to make sure we are ready for any emergency. How will I cook without electricity or natural gas to power my appliances? …

Safe Indoor Emergency Cooking Solutions

A winter storm rages outside when suddenly you are surrounded by an eerily, silent darkness. After grabbing a flashlight you realize that in a few minutes your hungry family is going to want to eat. How are you going to cook dinner without electricity? Preparing to safely cook indoors may be easier than you might …

Canned Heat – Safe Fuel for Indoor Emergency Cooking

Cooking during a power outage can be a bit challenging. In our emergency cooking classes, we present a wide variety of options for powerless cooking, most of which must be used outdoors. It is important to be able to cook both indoors and outdoors. Think about it, are you going to want to cook using …

Solar Cooking – Clean, Abundant, Free Energy

A solar oven uses the power of the sun to cook. In our climate, that means that the majority of days we can cook our meals outside without using additional energy, saving our precious fuel storage. Overcast days may decrease the temperature of the oven and, in turn, increase cooking time. Solar energy is a …

Charcoal – The Biggest Bang for Your Fuel Buck

When it comes to storage fuels, charcoal is one of safest and least expensive options. Charcoal briquettes burn very hot and are easily managed to distribute heat evenly. The one drawback is that they produce large amounts of carbon monoxide (a deadly gas) and should never be used indoors or in a garage where fumes …