Our family accepted the challenge to live for 90 days exclusively on the foods that we have stored in our home and what we can produce in our own backyard. We are quickly discovering a couple of items that we have missed in our food storage.

What can I substitute for butter in a recipe? Butter powder, ghee, unsweetened applesauce, pumpkin purée, mashed bananas, mashed avocado, prune purée, bean purée, nut butter, oil, yogurt, buttermilk, lard, margarine, vegetable oil, olive oil, coconut oil, avocado oil, and safflower oil are all reasonable replacements for butter. Quite frankly, none of these substitutions will make the final product taste exactly the same.

I have compiled this ultimate substitution list so we can still enjoy many of our favorite foods using the basic foods that we have stored in our prepper pantry even when we run short on an ingredient. Before we get to that list, let’s talk about basics you may want to include in your food storage.

Prepper Pantry Basics

There are a few items that are critical to a well-stocked prepper pantry. Stockpiling these items allows us to enjoy many of the basic recipes that we eat every day.

What should I store in my survival long term food storage supply?

  • Grains: wheat, Kamut, white rice, corn, rolled oats, steel-cut oats, pasta, and cocoa powder
  • Legumes: black beans, pinto beans, white beans, split peas, and lentils
  • Dehydrated Vegetables: onions, carrots, peppers, celery, and potato flakes
  • Seeds: flax seeds, chia seeds, sesame seeds, poppy seeds, and alfalfa seeds
  • Sweeteners: honey, maple syrup, granulated sugar, and brown sugar
  • Dairy: non-fat powdered milk, cheese (powdered, canned, freeze-dried), evaporated milk, and dried eggs
  • Cooking basics: baking soda, baking powder, cream of tartar, corn starch, iodized salt, pink Himalayan salt, canning salt, vinegar, lemon juice, soy sauce, and yeast
  • Spices: beef and chicken bouillon, chili powder, cumin, garlic (salt, granulated, and powder), onion powder, seasoned salt, creole seasoning, black pepper, lemon pepper, crushed red pepper, cayenne pepper, turmeric, oregano, basil, thyme, bay leaves, paprika, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, ginger and allspice
  • Fats: Coconut oil, olive oil, vegetable oil, peanut butter, and canned butter

Your list will likely be a little bit different than ours. There are some things that would make sense to store such as vegetable shortening due to the long shelf life. I have stored it in the past but I never use it. I decided to replace it with coconut oil because that is our favorite.

You should personalize your prepper pantry to meet your personal preferences and needs also. Learn more about how to build your long term survival food supply here.

Basic Ingredient Substitutions

Creating meals from basic staples can get a bit challenging when the recipe calls for an item that you don’t have. Check out these ideas for possible substitutions that you can use in your favorite recipes.

Alcohol

Alcohol can be substituted in a recipe using non-alcohol replacements. Be sure that you keep the amount of liquid equal to the original amount of alcohol in the recipe. Try these non-alcohol options when you need a replacement for alcohol in a recipe.

  • White wine = lemon juice diluted with a little water or chicken broth
  • Red wine = grape or pomegranate juice with a dash of red wine vinegar
  • Wine = apple juice in dessert recipes or chicken broth in savory dishes
  • Bourbon or whiskey = prune juice
  • Cognac = peach, apricot or pear nectar
  • Mirin or sake = rice vinegar
  • Kirsch = black cherry juice
  • Beer = club soda or seltzer or chicken broth with a little malt vinegar
  • Port = balsamic vinegar

Apple Pie Spice

1 teaspoon apple pie spice = ½ teaspoon cinnamon, ¼ teaspoon nutmeg, 1/8 teaspoon ground allspice plus a dash of ground cloves or ginger

Baking Soda (Bicarbonate of Soda or Sodium Bicarbonate)

Baking soda is used as a quick-acting leavening agent in baking. It helps food to rise as it releases carbon dioxide in bubbles. Mixing baking soda with acidic foods such as buttermilk, brown sugar, vinegar or lemon juice increases the release of carbon dioxide.

There is no real effective substitute for baking soda. It has an indefinite shelf life and is a foundational item in your long term food storage. It may lose potency in long term storage. You can easily check to see if it is still fresh by adding just a few drops of vinegar or lemon juice to ¼ teaspoon of baking soda. If the soda is still good, it will quickly produce healthy bubbles.

  • ¼ teaspoon baking soda = 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda = ½ teaspoon potassium bicarbonate (low sodium substitute)
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda = 3/4 teaspoon ammonium bicarbonate

Baking Powder

Baking powder is a foundational item to keep in your prepper pantry. It will safely store indefinitely but will lose the ability to leaven. Stir a teaspoon of baking powder into half of a cup of water and if it bubbles it is still viable.

  • 1 teaspoon baking powder = 1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar plus 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder = 1/3 teaspoon baking soda plus 1 teaspoon of lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder = 1/3 teaspoon baking soda plus 1 teaspoon of vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder = 1/4 teaspoon baking soda plus 1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar plus 1/4 teaspoon cornstarch

Recipe for homemade baking powder: 2 parts cream of tartar and 1 part baking soda

Butter

Butter creates moist and flavorful baked goods and plays a role in leavening. Nothing adequately replaces butter in a recipe. However, there are options that will still produce a delicious final product.

When substituting fat in a recipe with a “non-fat substance” you will get the best results if you substitute only half of the fat.

  • 1 cup butter = 1 cup butter powder plus 3 tablespoons water (or according to package directions)
  • 1 cup butter = 1 cup ghee (clarified butter with a long shelf life)
  • 1 cup butter = 1 cup unsweetened applesauce
  • 1 cup butter = 1 cup pumpkin purée
  • 1 cup butter = 1 cup mashed banana
  • 1 cup butter = 1 cup mashed avocado
  • 1 cup butter = 1 cup prune purée
  • 1 cup butter = 1 cup puréed white beans (light-colored baked products)
  • 1 cup butter = 1 cup puréed pinto beans (medium-colored baked products)
  • 1 cup butter = 1 cup puréed black beans (dark-colored baked products)
  • 1 cup butter = 1 cup nut butter
  • 1 cup butter = ½ cup oil mixed with 1/2 cup nut butter
  • 1 cup butter = ½ cup Greek yogurt
  • 1 cup butter = ½ cup buttermilk
  • 1 cup butter = 1 cup lard
  • 1 cup butter = 1 cup margarine
  • 1 cup butter = 3/4 cup vegetable shortening
  • 1 cup butter = 3/4 cup olive oil or safflower oil
  • 1 cup butter = 7/8 cup avocado oil
  • 1 cup butter = 1 cup coconut oil

Buttermilk

Buttermilk is slightly acidic and adds a delicious tang to baked products. It creates a softer texture and helps with leavening.

  • 1 cup buttermilk = 1 cup water plus 2 tablespoons buttermilk powder
  • 1 cup buttermilk = 1 cup yogurt
  • 1 cup buttermilk = 1 cup milk plus 1 tablespoon vinegar (let stand for 10 minutes)
  • 1 cup buttermilk = 1 cup milk plus 1 tablespoon lemon juice (let stand for 10 minutes)
  • 1 cup buttermilk = 1 cup milk plus 1 tablespoon of sour cream
  • 1 cup buttermilk = 1 cup milk plus 1¾ tablespoons cream of tartar (let stand for 5-10 minutes)
  • 1 cup buttermilk = 1 cup water mixed with 1/3 cup non-instant powdered milk plus 1 tablespoon vinegar (let stand for 10 minutes)
  • 1 cup buttermilk = 1 cup water mixed with 1/3 cup non-instant powdered milk plus 1 tablespoon lemon juice (let stand for 10 minutes)

Recipe for non-dairy buttermilk: substitute coconut milk, soy milk, rice milk, oat milk, or almond milk for the milk used in any of the substitutions above. Tofu buttermilk can be made by combining ¼ cup silken tofu, ¾ cup water and 1 tablespoon of lemon juice or vinegar with a pinch of salt.

Cajun Seasoning

1 tablespoon Cajun seasoning = ½ teaspoon white pepper plus ½ teaspoon garlic powder plus ½ teaspoon onion powder plus ½ teaspoon ground red pepper plus ½ teaspoon paprika plus ½ teaspoon black pepper

Cheese

Homemade cheese can be made from powdered milk. Consider storing canned cheese, Velveeta, bottled cheese spread, powdered cheese mixes or freeze-dried cheese to add flavor to your recipes. Many recipes may still be acceptable even if the cheese is omitted.

Chocolate (Bittersweet or Semi-sweet)

  • 1 ounce semi-sweet chocolate = 1 ounce unsweetened chocolate plus 1 tablespoon granulated sugar
  • 1 ounce semi-sweet chocolate = 3 tablespoons cocoa powder plus 3 tablespoons granulated sugar plus 1 tablespoon oil or melted butter
  • 1 ounce semi-sweet chocolate = 3 tablespoons melted semisweet chocolate chips

Chocolate (Unsweetened)

1 ounce unsweetened chocolate = 3 tablespoons natural cocoa powder plus 1 tablespoon unsalted butter, coconut oil, coconut butter, shortening, or vegetable oil

Cocoa Powder (Dutch Process)

1/2 cup Dutch-process cocoa powder = 1/2 cup natural cocoa and then replace the baking powder in the recipe with half the amount of baking soda

Cocoa Powder (Natural)

Cocoa powder is one ingredient that is important in my long term storage. As a foundational staple, I can use it to create a variety of delightful chocolate creations. When stored correctly, cocoa powder will store for many years. It may lose potency over time but it usually won’t ever go bad.

Cornstarch

Cornstarch is used as a thickener in sauces and also produces softer baked products. It has an indefinite shelf life and is a good staple for long term food storage.

  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch = 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch = 2 teaspoons arrowroot starch
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch = 1 tablespoon potato starch
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch = 2 tablespoons tapioca flour
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch = 3 tablespoons rice flour

Corn Syrup (Dark)

  • 1 cup dark corn syrup = ¾ cup light corn syrup plus ¼ cup light molasses

Corn Syrup (Light)

  • 1 cup light corn syrup = 1 cup granulated white sugar plus ¼ cup liquid

Cream (Half-and-Half)

  • 1 cup of half-and-half = 7/8 cup whole milk plus 2 tablespoons melted unsalted butter
  • 1 cup of half-and-half = 1 cup evaporated milk
  • 1 cup of half-and-half = ½ cup whole milk plus ½ cup heavy cream

Cream (Heavy)

  • 1 cup heavy cream = 2/3 cup whole milk plus 1/3 cup melted unsalted butter
  • 1 cup heavy cream = 1 cup whole milk plus 1 tablespoon melted butter

Cream (Sour)

  • 1 cup sour cream = 1 cup plain or Greek yogurt
  • 1 cup sour cream = 1 cup fresh cream
  • 1 cup sour cream = 1 cup buttermilk
  • 1 cup sour cream = 1 cup whole milk plus 1 tablespoon vinegar (let sit for 20 minutes)
  • 1 cup sour cream = 1 cup whole milk plus 1 tablespoon lemon juice (let sit for 20 minutes)
  • 1 cup sour cream = 1 cup heavy whipping cream plus 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 cup sour cream = 1 cup cottage cheese plus ¼ cup yogurt plus 1 teaspoon of lemon juice, blended
  • 1 cup sour cream = 1 cup cottage cheese plus 4 tablespoons milk plus 2 teaspoons lemon juices, blended
  • 1 cup sour cream = 1 cup coconut milk plus 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 cup sour cream = 2/3 cup powdered milk plus ¾ cup water plus 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  • 1 cup sour cream = 2/3 cup powdered milk plus ¾ cup water plus 1 teaspoon vinegar
  • 1 cup sour cream = 1 cup silken tofu plus 1 tablespoon lemon juice plus 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar and a pinch of salt, blended

Cream (Whipped Topping)

  • Whipped topping = 1 cup ice water plus 1 cup non-instant powdered milk (whip until thick) add 1 teaspoon lemon juice plus 1 teaspoon sugar and a few drops of vanilla.
  • Whipped topping = Dry whipped topping mix and ice water as directed on package

Cream of Tartar

Cream of tartar is an acidic salt that is created in the production of wine and grape juice. It has an indefinite shelf life.

Cream of tartar is used as a stabilizer in recipes or works with a base such as baking soda to create carbon dioxide bubbles which helps to create light baked products. It can be easily omitted in recipes for syrup, frosting, or when whipping egg whites. Good substitutes for cream of tartar are acidic.

  • 1 teaspoon cream of tartar = 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon cream of tartar = 1 teaspoon bottled lime juice
  • 1 teaspoon cream of tartar = 1 teaspoon white vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon cream of tartar = 1 ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon cream of tartar = Replace liquid in the recipe with 2 cups of buttermilk
  • 1 teaspoon cream of tartar = Replace liquid in the recipe with 2 cups of thin yogurt

Eggs (Whole)

Eggs are used in recipes as a binder, leavening agent, to add moisture, and to improve the taste of baked goods. Depending on the purpose the eggs serve in the recipe, some of these substitutions will work better than others.

Common Shelf Stable Egg Substitutes for Baking
  • 1 egg = 2 tablespoons dry egg powder and 1/4 cup warm water
  • 1 egg = 3 tablespoons mayonnaise
  • 1 egg = ¼ cup vegetable oil
  • 1 egg = 2 tablespoons water, 1 teaspoon oil, and 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 egg = ¼ cup unsweetened applesauce plus ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 egg = ¼ cup mashed banana
  • 1 egg = ¼ cup pureed fruit plus ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 egg = 3 tablespoons creamy nut butter
  • 1 egg = 1 tablespoon unflavored gelatin dissolved in 3 tablespoons boiling water
  • 1 egg = 1/4 teaspoon xanthan gum whipped into 1/4 cup water
  • 1 egg =1 ½ teaspoons of Ener-G Egg Replacer with 2-3 tablespoons of water
  • 1 egg = 1 teaspoon baking soda mixed with 1 tablespoon white vinegar
  • 1 egg = 1 teaspoon baking soda mixed with 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 egg = ¼ cup of pureéd tofu
  • 1 egg = ¼ cup plain yogurt
  • 1 egg = ¼ cup buttermilk
  • 1 egg = ¼ cup carbonated water
  • 1 egg = 1 tablespoon ground flaxseed plus 3 tablespoons water; let sit 5 minutes
  • 1 egg = 1 tablespoon of ground chia seeds mixed in 3 tablespoons water (let sit for 20 minutes)
  • 1 egg = 2 tablespoons soy or chickpea flour plus 2 tablespoons water
  • 1 egg = 2 tablespoons arrowroot powder mixed with 2 tablespoons water
  • 1 egg = 3 tablespoons aquafaba (the liquid beans are cooked in or the liquid in canned beans)
  • 1 egg = 1 tablespoon agar-agar powder mixed with 1 tablespoon water
  • 1 egg = 1 tablespoon soy lecithin
  • 1 egg = 1 tablespoon soy protein powder mixed in 3 tablespoons water

Flour (Cake)

1 cup cake flour = 3/4 cup all-purpose flour plus 2 tablespoons cornstarch

Flour (Self-Rising)

1 cup cake flour = 1 cup all-purpose flour + 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder plus ¼ teaspoon salt

Flour (Whole Wheat)

1 cup whole wheat flour = 7/8 cup all-purpose flour plus 2 tablespoons wheat germ

Herbs (Fresh)

1 tablespoon fresh herb = 1 teaspoon dried herb

Honey

Honey is a foundational item in our long term food storage that I don’t ever want to be without. It has an indefinite shelf life and is sweeter than sugar. Learn more about honey at Honey – Nature’s Perfect Longer-Term Storage Food

  • 1 cup of honey = ¾ cup light or dark corn syrup plus ½ cup granulated sugar
  • 1 cup of honey = 1 ¼ cup sugar plus 1/3 cup liquid

Lard

  • ½ cup lard = ½ cup solid vegetable shortening
  • ½ cup lard = ½ cup plus 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • ½ cup lard = ½ cup oil (coconut, olive, vegetable)

Lemon Juice

Lemon juice is a basic staple in a prepper pantry. It is highly versatile and will store for several years in a cool, dark location.

1 teaspoon lemon juice = 1/2 teaspoon apple cider vinegar

Marshmallow Cream

2.5 ounces marshmallow cream = 8 large marshmallows or 1 cup miniature marshmallows

Milk (Evaporated)

I always keep a case or two of evaporated milk on hand because it is a great way to store milk that contains a little bit of delicious fat.

  • 1 cup evaporated milk = 1 cup half and half
  • 1 cup evaporated milk = ¾ cup whole milk plus ¼ cup half-and-half
  • 1 cup evaporated milk = 2 ¼ cups milk reduced over medium-low heat to 1 cup of milk
  • 1 cup evaporated milk = 2 cups of rice or soy milk reduced over medium heat to 1 cup
  • 1 cup evaporated milk = 2/3 cup water plus 1 cup dry whole milk
  • 1 cup evaporated milk = ¾ cup water plus ¾ cup dry non-fat powdered milk

Milk (Sweetened Condensed)

14 ounce can sweetened condensed milk = 1 can (12 ounces) evaporated milk plus 1 ½ cups sugar, bring to boil, then add ½ teaspoon vanilla
14 ounce can sweetened condensed milk = 2 cups whole milk plus 2/3 cups sugar (honey or maple syrup), 4 tablespoons butter, simmer 30 minutes then add 1 teaspoon vanilla
14 ounce can sweetened condensed milk = 1 cup instant nonfat dry milk plus 2/3 cup sugar plus 3 tablespoons melted butter plus ½ teaspoon vanilla plus ½ cup boiling water and blend well
14 ounce can sweetened condensed milk = ¾ cup non-instant powdered milk plus ¾ cup sugar plus ½ cup hot water, blended
14 ounce can sweetened condensed milk = 1 cup nonfat dry milk plus 2/3 cup sugar plus 3 tablespoons melted butter plus a few drops vanilla plus ½ cup boiling water.

Milk (Whole)

  • 1 cup whole milk = 1 cup evaporated milk plus ½ cup water
  • 1 cup whole milk = 1 cup reconstituted powdered milk plus 1 teaspoon honey plus 2 teaspoons vegetable oil
  • 1 cup whole milk = 1 cup skim milk plus 2 tablespoons melted butter
  • 1 cup whole milk = 5/8 cup skim milk plus 3/8 cup half-and half
  • 1 cup whole milk = 2/3 cup 1% milk plus 1/3 cup half-and-half
  • 1 cup whole milk = ¾ cup 2% milk plus ¼ cup half-and-half
  • 1 cup whole milk = 7/8 cup skim milk plus 1/8 cup heavy cream

Molasses

  • 1 cup molasses = 1 cup dark corn syrup
  • 1 cup molasses = 1 cup honey

Mustard (Dry)

  • 1 teaspoon dry mustard = 1 tablespoon prepared mustard
  • 1 teaspoon dry mustard = ½ teaspoon mustard seeds, ground
  • 1 teaspoon dry mustard = ½ teaspoon wasabi powder (hotter)

Cooking Oil

Many cooking oils can be used interchangeably without noticeably affecting the texture of the finished product. However, substituting different oils from the one called for in the recipe can affect both the taste and appearance.

Cooking oil = melted butter, margarine, or shortening

Onion Soup Mix

1 packet onion soup mix = 2 tablespoons dried minced onion plus 2 teaspoons beef bouillon plus 1/2 teaspoon onion powder plus 1/8 teaspoon parsley flakes plus a dash each of salt, pepper, and paprika

Paprika

Paprika is a staple spice in our pantry. Below is a list of possible substitutes or alternatives you may use if you find yourself without paprika. The substitutions listed below will alter the end product somewhat.

  • 1 teaspoon paprika = 1/3 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
  • 1 teaspoon paprika = 1 teaspoon ground white or black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon paprika = 1/3 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 1 teaspoon paprika = 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon paprika = 1 teaspoon Cajun spice
  • 1 teaspoon paprika = 1 teaspoon Chipotle powder
  • 1 teaspoon paprika = 1 teaspoon hot sauce
  • 1 teaspoon paprika = 1 teaspoon tomato juice with a dash of chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon paprika = 1 teaspoon bell pepper powder
  • 1 teaspoon paprika = ½ teaspoon ground Aleppo pepper

Poultry Seasoning

1 tablespoon poultry seasoning = ¾ tablespoon dried sage plus ¼ tablespoon dried thyme or marjoram, crushed

Pumpkin Pie Spice

1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice = ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon plus ¼ teaspoon ground ginger plus 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves or allspice plus 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg

Salt

Some salts can be used interchangeably while others cannot. There is no real good substitute for salt so make sure that you always keep an ample supply on hand. To learn everything you need to know about storing and using salt visit our post, Salt: Why It Is Essential and How to Store It Right.

Soy Sauce

Soy sauce is a staple flavoring in our pantry and many of our favorite recipes wouldn’t be the same without it. Purchase soy sauce in a glass bottle and it will last indefinitely if stored in a cool, dark location.

  • 1 cup of soy sauce = ½ cup of Worcestershire sauce plus ½ cup water
  • 1 cup of soy sauce = 2 cloves minced garlic plus ¾ cup vinegar (mix and let stand overnight then strain) add 3 tablespoons dark molasses plus 3 teaspoons onion powder
  • 1 cup of soy sauce = 1 ½ cup water plus 4 tablespoons beef bouillon plus 4 teaspoons balsamic vinegar plus 2 teaspoons molasses plus ¼ teaspoon ground ginger plus a pinch of pepper plus a pinch of garlic powder, boil and reduce the mixture to 1 cup

Sugar (Dark Brown)

  • 1 cup dark brown sugar = 1 cup granulated sugar plus 2 tablespoons molasses
  • 1 cup dark brown sugar = 1 cup light brown sugar

Sugar (Light Brown)

  • 1 cup light brown sugar = 1 cup granulated sugar plus 1 tablespoon molasses
  • 1 cup light brown sugar = 1 cup dark brown sugar

Sugar (Powdered or Confectioner)

White sugar can be blended on the highest speed for about 45 seconds to create powdered sugar.

  • 2 ¾ cups powdered sugar = 2 cups granulated sugar plus 2 tablespoons cornstarch, blended until fluffy

Sugar (White or Granulated)

White sugar has an indefinite shelf life when stored appropriately and is a foundational item in a prepper pantry. It is an important preservative in home bottling.

The recommendation is to store 70 pounds of granulated sugar per person per year. This seems like a lot of sugar until you start making everything from scratch.

1 cup granulated sugar = ¾ cup honey (reduce liquid by ¼ cup or add ¼ cup flour)
1 cup granulated sugar = ¾ cup molasses (reduce liquid by ¼ cup or add ¼ cup flour)
1 cup granulated sugar = 1 cup brown sugar
1 cup granulated sugar = 2 cups powdered or confectioner’s sugar
1 cup granulated sugar = 1 teaspoon liquid stevia or ½ teaspoon stevia powder
1 cup granulated sugar = 2/3 cup agave (reduce the liquid in the recipe by ¼ cup)

Tapioca (Instant or Quick-Cooking)

  • 1 tablespoon tapioca = 1 ½ tablespoons flour
  • 1 tablespoon tapioca = 1 tablespoon corn starch

Tapioca (Flour)

The quantities listed below are for tapioca used as a thickener in recipes and not as a flour replacement.

  • 1 tablespoon tapioca flour = 1 ½ teaspoon cornstarch
  • 1 tablespoon tapioca flour = 1 tablespoon cassava flour
  • 1 tablespoon tapioca flour = 1 tablespoon potato starch
  • 1 tablespoon tapioca flour = 1 tablespoon flour
  • 1 tablespoon tapioca flour = 1 tablespoon arrowroot
  • 1 tablespoon tapioca flour = 1 ½ teaspoon rice flour

Vinegar

Vinegar is an important staple in your pantry and has an indefinite shelf life. Make sure to keep several gallons on hand at all times.

  • ¼ cup white vinegar = 1/3 cup lemon juice

Vinegar (Balsamic Vinegar)

  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar = 1 tablespoon cider vinegar plus ½ teaspoon sugar
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar = 1 tablespoon red or white wine vinegar plus ½ teaspoon sugar
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar = 1 tablespoon brown rice vinegar or Chinese black vinegar plus ½ teaspoon sugar

Vinegar (Red Wine)

Red wine vinegar adds both flavor and acidic properties to a recipe. Lemon or lime juice can be used to add acid to a recipe in place of vinegar when the flavor doesn’t play a role in the recipe.

  • 1 cup red wine vinegar = 1 cup red wine (unless recipe needs the acid from the vinegar)
  • 1 cup red wine vinegar = ¾ cup apple cider vinegar plus ¼ cup red wine

Vanilla Extract

  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract = 1 teaspoon bourbon
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract = 1 teaspoon rum
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract = 1 teaspoon maple syrup
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract = 1 whole vanilla bean
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract = ½ teaspoon vanilla powder

Yeast

My favorite yeast for long term storage is SAF-Instant yeast. I purchase it in the 1 pound brick and keep it in the bottom of our chest freezer. The longest I have stored it is 15 years and it was still viable. After opening, I place it in a canning jar in the refrigerator for up to one year.

Sourdough or natural yeast is an easy way to make bread without instant yeast. The method uses a fermentation process to make the bread rise over 8-24 hours. This method allows you to make bread using only flour, water, and salt.

Natural yeast sourdough bread

A good resource for learning to bake with natural yeast is The Art of Baking With Natural Yeast: Breads, Pancakes, Waffles, Cinnamon Rolls & Muffins by Caleb Warnock and Melissa Richardson.

A Well-Stocked Prepper Pantry Makes a Happy Cook

I hope you enjoy this huge list of substitutions that I have compiled as a direct result of my prepper pantry not having everything that I really needed. Once this “90 Day No Food Shopping Challenge” is over, I have several items that I will add to our list and keep stocked in my pantry so I hopefully won’t have to resort to using this list very often in the future.

Thanks for being part of the solution!

Jonathan and Kylene Jones