Prepper Pantry: 25 Shelf-Stable Egg Substitutes for Baking


We have a little flock of chickens that provide us with a constant supply of fresh eggs. However, there are times when production slows down or even stops altogether. It is possible that when we are in a crisis that requires us to live on our survival food supply we will not have the luxury of these fresh eggs.

Which basic shelf-stable foods can be an effective substitute for eggs in baked goods? Powdered eggs, fruit purée, nut butter, flaxseeds, chia seeds, Aquafaba, commercial egg replacers, cooking oil, baking powder, unflavored gelatin, xanthan gum, vinegar, lemon juice, carbonated water, soy flour, chickpea flour, arrowroot, agar-agar, soy lecithin powder, soy protein powder, potato starch, cornstarch, mayonnaise and canned milk are all shelf-stable basics that can take the place of eggs in your favorite recipes.

Shelf-stable ingredients are valuable during emergencies because they do not require refrigeration. It is easy to stock up on these basic supplies and be ready to feed your family during a power outage or during a personal financial crisis or even avoid a last-minute trip to the store to purchase eggs.

Let’s explore your options for egg substitutes in your favorite recipes.

The Function of Eggs in Baking

The primary function of eggs in most recipes include; binding, leavening, thickening, adding moisture, and improving the taste of baked goods. The eggs in a recipe may serve a single function or multiple functions.

Depending on the purpose the eggs serve in the recipe, some of these substitutions will work better than others. Get creative and experiment to find the perfect egg substitute for your favorite recipes.

Shelf-Stable Egg Substitutes That Bind Ingredients Together

The best shelf-stable egg substitutes to use as a binder in recipes are ground chia seeds, ground flax seeds, agar-agar, arrowroot powder, tapioca flour, unflavored gelatin, and potato starch. Any starches help bind baked goods together.

Shelf-Stable Egg Substitutes That Leaven

The best shelf-stable egg substitutes to help with leavening include commercial egg replacement powders and baking powder. One trick is to add 1/8 teaspoon baking powder per egg in a recipe to prevent a baked product from being too heavy or dense.

Shelf-Stable Egg Substitutes That Add Moisture

The best shelf-stable egg substitutes to provide moisture in a recipe include applesauce, pumpkin purée, mashed potatoes, banana purée (baby food or reconstituted dried bananas), fruit juice, oil, and milk.

Shelf-Stable Egg Replacements

The egg yolk in a recipe helps with leavening or rising, while the egg white binds the ingredients together. A real egg can be a bit tricky to adequately replace. Remember that 1 large egg measures just a little shy of 1/4 cup.

Each of the egg substitutes discussed below has advantages and disadvantages. Some are better suited for one recipe than another. Take a little bit of time to experiment and learn which egg substitutions will work best in your favorite recipes.

Powdered Eggs

Powdered eggs are dehydrated whole eggs. You can purchase dried whole eggs, dehydrated yolks, or egg white powder. Freeze-dried scrambled eggs are also available but that will not work well for baking.

Dehydrated eggs stored in a #10 can will last for up to 10 years if stored in a cool dry location. A #10 can will contain roughly 72 to 94 eggs (depending on the manufacturer).

Dried whole eggs

It may be easier to add powdered eggs to the dry ingredients in the recipe and then increase the liquid by the required amount. It is not necessary to reconstitute the eggs before mixing them into baked goods.

Whole dry eggs can be used to make omelets, French toast or other egg dishes whereas most other egg substitutes cannot.

1 whole egg = 2 tablespoons dry egg powder plus 2 tablespoons warm water (or as directed on the package)

Fruit Purée

Fruit purées are great egg substitutes when the purpose of the egg is to add moisture to the recipe as in muffins, cakes, brownies, and pancakes. Adding ½ teaspoon of baking soda or powder in the recipe will help with leavening and prevent the final product from being too dense when substituting fruit purée for eggs.

Fruit puree

Canned fruits are a short term food storage item and can reasonably be stored for 5 to 7 years in a cool, dry location.

  • 1 whole egg = ¼ cup unsweetened applesauce
  • 1 whole egg = ¼ cup pumpkin purée
  • 1 whole egg = ¼ cup puréed fruit (fresh, canned, or rehydrated dehydrated or freeze-dried)
  • 1 whole egg = ¼ cup mashed banana (baby food bananas or reconstituted dehydrated bananas)

Potato Flakes

Mashed potatoes can be substituted for eggs to add moisture as well as help with leavening. I love using potato flakes in baked products. See our post Potato Flakes: Delicious and Versatile Long-Term Food Storage Staple to learn more about the magic of potato flakes.

Potato flakes

Potato flakes packaged for short term storage will only last a few years but are highly convenient. Potato flakes stored in a #10 can have a shelf life of 25-30 years when stored in a cool dry location.

  • 1 whole egg = 1/4 cup mashed potatoes
  • 1 whole egg = 2 tablespoons potato flakes and 3 tablespoons warm water

Creamy Nut Butter

Nut butters, such as peanut butter, are good binders in cookies, brownies, and pancakes. Creamy works better than chunky butter unless you are looking for that extra crunch.

Creamy peanut butter

Unopened nut butter will store for a couple of years past the expiration date on the package if stored in a cool, dry location. Nut butter is a short-term storage item and will go rancid due to the high-fat content.

Rancidity creates both an unpleasant taste and odor. If the nut butter smells a little bit off, discard it.

1 whole egg = 3 tablespoons creamy nut butter (peanut butter, almond butter, etc.)

Flaxseeds

Ground flaxseed mixed with water is a good substitute for baked products where the egg is used to bind the ingredients together. It will add a little bit of a nutty taste to the finished product.

Flax Seeds

Whole flaxseeds will store for a couple of years in a cool, dry, dark location in an airtight container. I like to grind mine fresh in a coffee grinder. Once flaxseeds are ground they have a short shelf life. Flaxseeds are high in healthy oils which means that they will go rancid over time. The cooler the storage temperature, the longer they will last.

1 whole egg = 1 tablespoon ground flaxseed plus 3 tablespoons warm water; let sit 5-10 minutes

Chia Seeds

Ground chia seeds make a wonderful egg replacement when mixed with water to create a healthy gel. Chia seeds are high in fat and will go rancid over time. If they smell rancid, they are too old.

Optimal storage conditions include; cool, dry, and dark. Chia seeds should be fine when stored in a cool location for a couple of years. Whole chia seeds have a longer shelf life than ground chia seeds. I like to grind them in a coffee grinder just before using.

Chia seeds

1 whole egg = 1 tablespoon of ground chia seeds mixed in 3 tablespoons warm water (let sit for 20 minutes until gelled)

Aquafaba

Aquafaba is the thick liquid you see in canned beans. Chickpeas (garbanzo beans), white or northern beans are commonly used due to the light color and mild flavor. It is a combination of starch, protein, and vegetable gum.

Simply whip the cooled bean liquid with a mixer just like you whip up egg whites. It is amazing!

Garbanzo beans or chick peas for Aquafaba

Aquafaba is a great substitute for egg whites in recipes. You can use it in pancakes, meringues, quiche, mayonnaise, ice cream, and even in chocolate mousse (see the recipe below). Aquafaba also works well as an egg substitute in cookies and cakes.

Canned beans will last for several years in your short term food supply. Dry beans have a 25 to 30-year shelf life when stored correctly. Homemade Aquafaba can be stored in the refrigerator for 2 to 3 days or freeze in ice cube trays for future use. It is an inexpensive substitute for eggs.

1 whole egg = 3 tablespoons Aquafaba (the liquid that beans are cooked in or the liquid in canned beans)
1 egg white = 2 tablespoons whipped Aquafaba
1 egg yolk = 1 tablespoon Aquafaba

Aquafaba Chocolate Mousse

Chocolate Mousse made with Aquafaba is surprisingly delicious! It is a fantastic way to turn very basic food storage into a tasty treat.

  • Melt 7 ounces of dark chocolate and set aside.
  • Whip 1/2 cup of Aquafaba liquid and ½ cup white sugar until the mixture forms stiff peaks (about 10 minutes).
  • Fold melted chocolate into whipped mixture.
  • Spoon into serving glasses and chill for at least one hour.
  • Top with raspberries, chopped nuts, or chocolate pieces.

Homemade Aquafaba Recipe

  • Cover chickpeas, or other legumes, with water and let them soak overnight.
  • Do not drain the soaking water and add just enough additional water to completely submerge chickpeas.
  • Bring to a boil and simmer for 25-30 minutes or until tender. Alternatively, you can pressure cook the beans for 7-10 minutes and allow pressure to be released naturally.
  • Strain the beans and save the liquid.
  • Once the Aquafaba liquid is cooled it should be a thick consistency. If not, simmer for 5-10 minutes to reduce and thicken the liquid.

Commercial Egg Replacer

Most egg replacers are a mix of potato and/or tapioca starches, along with leavening agents. Ener-G Egg Replacer and Bob’s Red Mill are popular brands.

Commercial egg replacers are flavorless and are suitable for all baked goods.

Egg replacer

1 whole egg = 1½ teaspoons Ener-G Egg Replacer with 2 tablespoons warm water

1 whole egg = 1 tablespoon Bob’s Red Mill Egg Replacer with 2 tablespoons water

Homemade Ener-G Egg Replacer Powder

  • 2 ½ cups potato starch
  • 1 ½ cups tapioca starch
  • 2/3 cup baking powder
  • 1/3 cup baking soda

Combine ingredients well and store in an airtight container.

1 whole egg = 1 ½ tablespoon egg replacer powder and 2 tablespoons water
1 egg yolk = 1 ½ tablespoon egg replacer powder plus 1 tablespoon water
1 egg white = ½ tablespoon egg replacer powder plus 2 tablespoon water

Cooking Oil

Cooking oils can be used as an egg replacement if the purpose of the egg is to leaven and add moisture to the baked good. Cooking oil works for 1 or 2 eggs in a recipe but any more than that may make it too greasy. The specific oil may affect the final taste of the product.

Cooking oil

The shelf life of cooling oil depends on the variety and level of purity. For instance, refined coconut oil has a 2-year shelf life while virgin or extra-virgin coconut oil may last indefinitely.

Actual shelf life will depend on storage temperature. Cooking oil can last for many years if stored at 40 degrees and may only last for a year at 80 degrees. Cooking oils will turn rancid and one quick whiff will let you know when it is no longer good.

1 whole egg = 1½ tablespoons cooking oil plus 1½ tablespoons water plus 1 teaspoon baking powder (when the purpose of the egg is to help with leavening)

1 whole egg = ¼ cup cooking oil (when the purpose of the egg is to add moisture)

Baking Powder

Baking powder helps with leavening in cookies and cakes as an egg substitute.

Baking powder is a short term storage item and has a shelf-life of at least 2 years when stored unopened in a cool, dry location. Baking powder does not actually go bad but it will gradually lose potency. Viable baking powder will fizz when you stir ½ teaspoon of baking powder in a cup of boiling water.

1 whole egg = 2 teaspoons water, 1 teaspoon oil, and 2 teaspoons baking powder

1 whole egg = 1 ½ teaspoon baking powder plus 1 tablespoon water plus 1 tablespoon vinegar

Unflavored Gelatin

Gelatin is a good binder to replace eggs in baking. You may need to add a little bit of baking soda to help with leavening so that the final product will not be too dense.

Unflavored Gelatin

Unflavored gelatin has an indefinite shelf life when stored appropriately in a cool dry location. Protect the gelatin from moisture in storage.

1 whole egg = 1 tablespoon unflavored gelatin dissolved in 3 tablespoons boiling water. Beat until frothy.

Xanthan Gum

Xanthan gum is a good binder to reduce crumbliness and will help replace the moisture in your baked goods. It will not help with leavening so you may want to add a little bit of extra baking soda or baking powder.

xanthan gum

Xanthan gum has a shelf life of up to 10 years when stored in a cool dry location.

1 whole egg = Whip 1/4 teaspoon xanthan gum in ¼ cup water

White Vinegar

Vinegar as an egg replacer is best in cupcakes and quick breads that can benefit from a little extra lift.

Vinegar has an indefinite shelf life and is a great foundational storage item for long term food storage.

1 egg = 1 teaspoon baking soda mixed with 1 tablespoon white vinegar

Lemon Juice

Lemon juice is a good egg replacer when additional leavening is beneficial as in lighter baked goods such as cakes or cupcakes.

Lemon juice is a short term food storage item and will store in a cool location for a few years after the expiration date on the bottle. Peak quality is guaranteed through the expiration date. If the bottle is leaking or bulging, or if it has developed an off odor or appearance throw it out.

1 whole egg = 1 teaspoon baking soda mixed with 1 tablespoon lemon juice

Carbonated Water

Carbonated water helps with the rise or leavening in baked products. It will store for a couple of years at room temperature.

1 whole egg = ¼ cup carbonated water

Soy Flour

Soy flour is a good egg replacer and makes baked goods lighter and fluffier.

Soy flour

Due to high-fat content, soy flour has only a 1 to 2-year shelf life in a cool, dry location. Soybeans packaged for long term storage in a #10 can and stored in a cool location can last for 25-30 years.

1 whole egg = 1 heaping tablespoon soy flour plus 2 tablespoons water

Chickpea or White Bean Flour

Chickpea or bean flour is a good binder and will also help with leavening.

Chickpea flour

The flour has a short shelf life of 1 to 2 years when stored in a cool dry location. However, legumes will store for 25-30 years and can be ground into flour as needed using a Blendtec Blender.

1 whole egg = Mix 3 tablespoons chickpea or white bean flour plus 3 tablespoons water until creamy

Arrowroot Powder

Arrowroot powder is typically used as a thickening agent or as a binder in gluten-free baking. It makes a good substitute for eggs in a pudding or custard.

Arrowroot powder has up to a 10-year shelf life when stored in a cool, dry location. Arrowroot powder does not actually go bad, it loses its ability to thicken.

1 whole egg = 2 tablespoons arrowroot powder mixed with 3 tablespoons water

Agar-Agar

Agar-Agar is a vegetable gelatin made from red algae. It is used as a thickener in puddings, custards, and as a replacement for pectin in jams and jellies. Agar-Agar is a good substitute for egg whites and helps to bind the ingredients in a recipe together. Adding a little baking powder will keep the final product from being too dense.

Agar-Agar is a short term food storage item and should be rotated. When stored in a cool, dry location, it should be viable for a few years past the expiration date.

Note that Agar-Agar flakes and Agar-Agar powder are different.

1 whole egg = 1 tablespoon Agar-Agar flakes soaked in ¼ cup hot water for 10 minutes.

1 whole egg = 1 tablespoon Agar-Agar powder mixed with 1 tablespoon water. Whip, chill, and whip again.

1 egg white = 1 teaspoon Agar Agar powder dissolved in 1 tablespoon warm water. Add as the last ingredient in a recipe.

Soy Lecithin Powder

Soy lecithin is an emulsifying agent that combines fat and water. It is a good binding agent as an egg substitute.

Soy lecithin powder

Soy lecithin is a short term food storage item and has a shelf life of at least 2 years and will gradually lose potency.

1 whole egg = Add 1 tablespoon soy lecithin to the recipe

Soy Protein Powder

Soy protein flour is an effective substitute for eggs in baking cakes and cupcakes.

The shelf life of soy protein powder is 2 to 3 years when stored in a cool dry location. If protein powder has developed an off-color, odor, or taste, discard it.

1 whole egg = 1 tablespoon soy protein powder mixed in 3 tablespoons water

Potato Starch

Potato starch works well as an egg substitute for cookies, cakes, and breads.

Potato starch

Potato starch is a short-term storage item and has a shelf life of 1 to 2 years in a cool, dry location. You may want to add 1/8 teaspoon of baking powder per egg to help with leavening.

1 whole egg = 1 tablespoons potato starch plus 3 tablespoons warm water

Cornstarch

Cornstarch is an effective egg substitute for cookies and baked goods.

Corn starch is a good long-term survival food storage item with an indefinite shelf life when stored in a cool, dry location. It may be a good idea to add 1/8 teaspoon baking powder per egg to help with leavening replacing eggs with cornstarch.

1 whole egg = 1 tablespoons cornstarch mixed with 3 tablespoons warm water

Mayonnaise

Mayonnaise is a good egg substitute and works as a binder as well as adds moisture to a recipe. You may want to decrease the amount of fat or oil in your recipe to compensate for the oil in the mayonnaise.

Mayonnaise is a short term food storage item. The official recommendation for the shelf-life of mayonnaise is 30 days after the expiration date on the bottle. However, this recommendation is the date it is guaranteed to maintain quality and freshness. It will generally be safe to consume for a little while longer if it has been stored in a cool dry location.

Discard mayonnaise if it has any sign of mold, smells bad, tastes bad or if the color has changed. Don’t risk it!

1 whole egg = 3 tablespoons mayonnaise

Milk

Evaporated milk, reconstituted dry milk, soy milk, rice milk or coconut milk can be used as an egg substitute in some recipes. If there is no other liquid in a recipe, the egg is probably included to add moisture. Milk is a good option to add the needed liquid in these recipes.

milk

Dry or powdered milk has a shelf-life of up to 10 years when stored in a cool dry location. Liquid canned milk products have a 3-5 year shelf life. Shelf-stable milk has a shelf-life of up to 1 year when stored in a cool location.

1 whole egg = ¼ cup milk

Stock Up on Your Favorite Egg Replacer Ingredients

These 25 shelf-stable options are bound to provide you with a couple of options that will work well in your favorite food storage recipes.

I created a PDF summary of some of the best shelf-stable egg replacements and I encourage you to print it out and place it with your recipes so you will have it when you need it in the future.

My favorite egg replacement from basic long term survival food storage include:

  • cornstarch
  • baking soda
  • vinegar
  • coconut oil
  • dry powdered milk
  • chickpeas or white beans
  • unflavored gelatin
  • potato flakes
  • dried apples and
  • dried bananas.

These items have a very long shelf life and will be important staples if the time comes that you need to live on your survival food supply.

Pinterest 25 shelf stable egg substitutes

My favorite short term storage egg replacers include:

  • powdered eggs
  • chia seeds
  • flaxseeds
  • canned beans (for Aquafaba)
  • canned applesauce or fruit (to purée)
  • lemon juice
  • baking powder
  • peanut butter and
  • mayonnaise.

These basics can be used as egg replacers and are also just great staples to have in your family food stores.

Start to experiment today and decide exactly which staples you need to add to your prepper pantry to ensure you are able to bake delicious treats without eggs.

Thanks for being part of the solution!

Jonathan and Kylene Jones

Kylene

Kylene Jones is a blogger, content creator, published author, motivational speaker, homesteader, prepper, mother, and grandmother. She practices self-reliance, provident living, and emergency preparedness in her everyday life. She loves working with her husband, Jonathan, and is committed to helping our community be prepared to thrive during the challenges that lie in our future.

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